We Are KENYA Ostomy Association

KENYA OSTOMY ASSOCIATION
We are Kenya Ostomy Association (KOA). We are a non-profit organization in Kenya committed to improving the lives of ostomates through provision of ostomy supplies and resources, and essential ostomy health knowledge and information.
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KENYA OSTOMY ASSOCIATION [KOA]
We are Kenya Ostomy Association (KOA). We are a registered non-profit organization committed to improving the lives of ostomates across Kenya. We provide them with essential ostomy care supplies, vital ostomy information, and psychosocial support.
Read more
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ABOUT US

Kenya Ostomy Association (KOA) is a registered non-profit organization specializing in provision of ostomy supplies and educational resources to ostomates and caregivers in Kenya.

It was founded on the premise and need to stand in the gap for ostomates and change the ostomy landscape.  

Stoma is certainly an increasingly serious handicap that requires attention and resources to save the lives of many people. KOA aims at raising awareness about ostomy and leading the response against it. We are committed to helping the ostomates get supplies and psychosocial support and highlight the challenges they experience.

The principal activity of our organization is supporting the ostomates through a direct supply of ostomy care products, provision of a supportive community and information on ostomy care.

KENYA OSTOMY ASSOCIATION - OUR Promise

LEADING THE RESPONSE AGAINST OSTOMY

Stoma has increasingly become a problem, causing many ostomates physical, psychological and emotional distress challenges in the their lives. As such, there is need to have a structure in place to support them.
Kenya Ostomy Association was established to help alleviate these challenges and creating a supportive community. KOA is committed to supporting ostomates in Kenya and beyond.

OUR PROMISE

We are on a mission to support ostomates and empower them to lead quality, confident and fulfilling lives. Note that KOA does not only help patients with colon cancer but any colon or intestinal-related issues that require ostomy bags (colostomy, ileostomy, urostomy) and ostomy care.

Salome Agallo Kwenda

Founder - Kenya Ostomy Association

YOUR DONATION MAKES A DIFFERENCE

Donate ostomy supplies or make a financial contribution to help OSTOMATES IN NEED

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Volunteers Since 2022
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New Cases

Ostomy Reviews

A kind gesture can reach a wound that only compassion can heal. OSTOMATES, IN THEIR OWN WORDS.

Volunteers

As a charity organization, we rely on volunteers to keep our operations running to impact more ostomates. CONTACT US TO INQUIRE HOW YOU CAN BECOME A VOLUNTEER AND ADD VALUE.

INTERESTED? CALL OR TEXT

+254 725234935 kenyaostomyassociation@gmail.com

Frequently Asked Questions

OSTOMY FAQ

All the information you need to know about us and ostomy

An ostomy causes a change in the way urine or stool exits the body as a result of a surgical procedure. Bodily waste is rerouted from its usual path because of malfunctioning parts of the urinary or digestive system. An ostomy can be temporary or permanent.

A stoma is an opening created by ostomy surgery. It is located on the abdomen and is dark pink in color. For most ostomies, a pouch is worn over the stoma to collect stool or urine. For some people it is possible to have a continent diversion,  an alternative to a conventional ostomy that eliminates the necessity for a pouch.

Ostomy surgery is a life-saving procedure that allows bodily waste to pass through a surgically created stoma on the abdomen into a prosthetic known as a ‘pouch’ or ‘ostomy bag’ on the outside of the body or an internal surgically created pouch for continent diversion surgeries. An ostomy may be necessary due to birth defects, cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis, incontinence and many other medical conditions. They are also necessary in cases of severe abdominal or pelvic trauma resulting from accidents or from injuries sustained during military service.

Ostomy or continent diversion surgery can occur at any age and does not lower life expectancy but is the start of a “new normal” life.

 

Read more: https://www.ostomy.org/what-is-an-ostomy/

  1. COLOSTOMY

The surgically created opening of the colon (large intestine) which results in a stoma. A colostomy is created when a portion of the colon or the rectum is removed and the remaining colon is brought to the abdominal wall. It may further be defined by the portion of the colon involved and/or its permanence.

2. UROSTOMY

This is a general term for a surgical procedure which diverts urine away from a diseased or defective bladder. The ileal or cecal conduit procedures are the most common urostomies. Either a section at the end of the small bowel (ileum) or at the beginning of the large intestine (cecum) is surgically removed and relocated as a passageway (conduit) for urine to pass from the kidneys to the outside of the body through a stoma. It may include removal of the diseased bladder.

3. ILEOSTOMY

A surgically created opening from the ileum, the lowest part of the small intestine. The intestine is brought through the abdominal wall to form a stoma. Ileostomies may be temporary or permanent, and may involve removal of all or part of the colon.

You should first tell those who need to know, such as healthcare providers, your spouse or partner, and people who are involved in your recuperative care.

Don’t feel that you have to explain your surgery to everyone who asks. It is your choice who you choose to share with and how much information you are comfortable sharing. Some people are just curious and explaining that you had an abdominal surgery is more than adequate. Sharing your story can be powerful however and help educate the larger community and your circle of friends that people with an ostomy are all around us living healthy lives.

KOA is active on all social media platforms. You can find us using the information below:

Email: kenyaostomyassociation@gmail.com

Facebook: Kenya Ostomy Association (Group)

Twitter: kenya_ostomy

Instagram: @kenyaostomyassociation

TikTok: Kenya Ostomy Association

Contact Sally on +254725234935 to be added to WhatsApp Group Community. 

As your strength returns, you can go back to your regular activities. Most people can return to their previous line of work; however, communicate with your healthcare team about your daily routines, so they can assist you in returning to maximum health as early as possible. Check with a medical professional about abdominal strengthening as there is an increased risk of a hernia from some activity and search out information from other athletes with ostomies.

There may be some modifications in your diet according to the type of ostomy surgery. People with colostomy and ileostomy surgery should return to their normal diet after a period of adjustment. Introduce foods back into your diet a little at a time and monitor the effect of each food on the ostomy function. Chew your food well and drink plenty of fluids. Some less digestible or high roughage foods are more likely to create the potential for blockage problems (i.e., corn, coconut, mushrooms, nuts, raw fruits, and vegetables).

There are no eating restrictions as a result of urostomy surgery. Patients should drink plenty of liquids each day following the healthcare team’s recommendations.

Sexual relationships and intimacy are important and fulfilling aspects of your life that should continue after ostomy surgery. Your attitude is a key factor in re-establishing sexual expression and intimacy. A period of adjustment after surgery is to be expected. Sexual function in women is usually not impaired. Some men who have a urostomy may experience changes in sexual function. Discuss any problems with your physician and/or ostomy nurse.

For women seeking to become pregnant their ability to conceive does not change and pregnancy and delivery should be normal after ostomy surgery. However, if you are thinking about becoming pregnant, you should first check with your doctor about any other health problems.

The adhesiveness and durability of pouching systems vary. Anywhere from three to seven day is to be expected. Itching or burning are signs that the wafer should be changed. Changing too frequently or wearing one too long may be damaging to the skin. Talk to your colorectal surgeon or proctologist.

Sexual relationships and intimacy are important and fulfilling aspects of your life that should continue after ostomy surgery. Your attitude is a key factor in re-establishing sexual expression and intimacy. A period of adjustment after surgery is to be expected. Sexual function in women is usually not impaired. Some men who have a urostomy may experience changes in sexual function. Discuss any problems with your physician and/or ostomy nurse.

For women seeking to become pregnant their ability to conceive does not change and pregnancy and delivery should be normal after ostomy surgery. However, if you are thinking about becoming pregnant, you should first check with your doctor about any other health problems.

You should call the doctor/proctologist or ostomy nurse when you experience anything out the ordinary or have:

 1. severe cramps lasting more than two or three hours

 2. a deep cut in the stoma

 3. excessive bleeding from the stoma opening (or a moderate amount in the pouch at several emptyings)

 4. continuous bleeding at the junction between the stoma and skin

 5. severe skin irritation or deep ulcers

 6. unusual change in stoma size and appearance

 7. severe watery discharge lasting more than five or six hours

 8. continuous nausea and vomiting; or

 9. the ostomy does not have any output for four to six hours and is accompanied by cramping and nausea.

10. any other worrying concerns or observations.

Kenya Ostomy Association (KOA) is a charitable organization, as such, we rely on volunteers to keep our operations running. If interested to volunteer in any capacity, contact us and we shall onboard you promptly.